Clan, Sept and Family Links

 
 

(Part of the following is a summary from my genetic history as determined through the National Geographic and IBM Genographic Project;  see my genetic ‘migration route’ map below.  This family history is by necessity from a male perspective and I hope to continue to expand my knowledge of the female lines through further research in future.)


World Clans:  My Genographic genetic Y-chromosome history results show that I belong to the Haplogroup R1b (M343); a group (R1b) that roughly 70 percent of men in southern England belong to, with this rising to over 90 percent in Spain and Ireland.






Map:  National Geographic Genographic Project (13 Aug 2010)



Based on a series of 12 genetic markers or loci (M) my earliest Homo sapiens ancestor ‘Adam’ (M168) emerged from Africa roughly 60 to 50,000 years ago (and Mum thought it was the Milkman!); the next male ancestor (M89) moved through the Middle East 45,000 years ago following the great game herds (buffalo, antelope and wooly mammoths) through what is now modern-day Iran to the vast steppes of Central Asia; a ‘Eurasian Clan’ member, a man born around 40,000 years ago (M9) in Iran or Southern Central Asia, followed the herds ever eastwards to the three massive mountain ranges of Central Asia (the ‘Pamir Knot’); the next male (M45) arose around 35,000 years ago in Central Asia and moved to the north of the mountainous Hindu Kush and onto the game-rich steppes of present-day Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and southern Siberia;  after spending considerable time in Central Asia, surviving the harsh conditions of the ice age,  a male ancestor from the ‘Central Asian Clan’ (M207) headed west towards the European subcontinent 30,000 years ago, and one lineage (M173) moved in one of the first large waves of humans to colonize Europe (the ‘Aurignacian culture’); around 20,000 years ago the expanding ice sheets forced my ancestors to move south to Spain, Italy and the Balkans, and as the ice sheets retreated  temperatures became warmer (about 12,000 years ago) and descendants moved to repopulate places that had become inhospitable during the ice age;  and finally, a man around 30,000 years ago gave rise to the defining genetic marker (M343) of my haplogroup which identifies me as a direct descendent of the Clan who dominated the human expansion into Europe, the Cro-Magnon.



Gaelic Clan: I am of the Gaelic  O‘Leathlobhair Sept (Clan). The Lalors (in modern times spelt three different ways - Lawlor, Lalor and Lawler) were of the Cruithen people who lived on both sides of the Irish Sea between Ulster and what is now Scotland.  (Refer to the ‘Kings of Ulster’ for more Irish history.)


The most ancient grant of a Coat of Arms: Gold with red lion and the family motto ‘Fortis et Fidelis’ (Brave and Faithful)’


The O’Lalors were one of the Seven Septs of Leix (Laois) and were located near the famous Rock of Dunamase in County Leix.  Nearly all the ‘family’ in Ireland are to be found in Leinster, either in Laois or in the counties lying to the east of it.


(For Irish family information use links to O’Lalor and John Stewart Lawlor and the official Lawlor Home page).



Aotearoa - New Zealand Clan:  These familial lines were re-connected at the Family Reunion held in Gore (25-27 Nov 1991).  (For more information refer to ‘The Descendants of Michael and Sarah Lawlor’ compiled by Glenys Kelly 1998, Evagean Publishing, Titirangi, Auckland, NZ.)


I am directly descended from Michael Lawlor (1819-1881) (my great-great grandfather) and Sarah (Sally) Roche (1827-1912) who were married 4 Feb 1845 in Kerry, Ireland.  Michael and Sarah farmed 33 acres of land in the Townland of Fortwilliam in the Parish of O’Dorney, Barony of Clanmaurice (leased from David Roche, his father-in-law, who in turn leased his lands from the Anglo-Irish landlord William T. Crosbie Esq.)  Sarah and Michael had 10 children (Thomas, Johanna, Bridget, David Roche, Mary, Margaret or Peggy, Michael Roche, John, Agnes and Sarah Roche) and I am descended from their eighth-born, John Lawlor (1861-1934) (my great grandfather), who married (3 May 1883) Delia Fahey (1861-?) at Manderville, Gore, New Zealand.  John was born at Castleisland, County Kerry, Ireland and moved to New Zealand possibly following his father’s death in 1881.


John and Delia had five children (Sarah, James, Thomas,

Richard and Mary or Mamie) and I am descended from their third-born Thomas (1888-1973) (my grandfather) who married (25 Jun 1919) Beatrice Harrison (1988-1976) of Clive in Hasting NZ.  ‘Uncle Tom’ and ‘Nana’ (Lawlor) first lived in Clive, then shifted to Glen Oroa (Palmerston North) managing the cheese factory, and then moved back to Hastings where Tom worked in the Haumoana Freezing Works;  I have many fond memories of family holidays with them, visiting the Clive relatives, and enjoying the sites and pleasures of Napier and Haumoana Beach.


Tom and Beatrice had four children (twins who died at birth, Rex and Frank Raymond or Bucky) and Rex is my father.

 

profile




Name: Ian Thomas Lawlor

Gender: Male

Age: 57

Birthday: August 27 1953

Status: Not married

Hometown: Rotorua (NZ)



occupation




Industry: Heritage

Occupation: Consultant (archaeology, conservation and sustainable resource management)

School: Hawera, Dargaville and Poudre Highs

Location: NZ and Ft Collins Colorado USA



favorites




Reports and Publications: http://auckland.academia.edu/IanLawlor


New Reading: David Simmons (2013) Greater Maori Auckland; David Williams (1999) Te Kooti Tango Whenua; Giselle Byrnes (Ed) (2009) The New Oxford History of New Zealand.


Movies:


TV Shows: BBC News, Discovery, ER, Arts, National Geographic


Musicians: Sarah McLachlan (Closer: The Best of...), Franco Battiato (Shadow, Light), APO, Upbeat with Eva Radich


Travel Destination: USA



contact




ian.lawlor@vodafone.co.nz

+64(0)21684574

+64(0)93612017



curriculum vitae




To see my current CV use the following link (Ian Lawlor CV 14 Oct 2013.

 

Genographic (World), O’Leathlobhair (Gaelic) and Immediate Family (NZ) Clans

Photos:  Wine tasting Hawks Bay (Aug 2011).